The Youth Criminal Justice Act

The Youth Criminal Justice Act, also known as YCJA is the law that governs Canada’s youth justice system. This law applies to young offenders within the age of 12-17. Its objective is to prevent further crimes to be committed by teenagers, they want to achieve a long-term protection of the public. Although there are some aspects that need to change, YCJA is an effective piece of legislation overall. It effectively promotes rehabilitation and reintegration, protects the minor’s identification, however, reoffenders still happen because it does not discourage crimes.
The perspectives that are presented in the source shows three opinions on the YCJA. The first perspective is in favor, asserting that the act has been effective to the young offenders. The second stating that just because the minors are charged differently and separately from the adults, doesn’t mean they are not accountable for their wrong-doings. The third one affirming that the act is a failure, therefore, this quote is against the YCJA. The YCJA gives young offenders a chance to be rehabilitated and reintegrated. The Act emphasizes the importance of the youth’s well-being and reintegrating back to the society. For instance, a case in Medicine Hat where a 12-year-old girl who murdered her whole family and spent a 10-year sentence in total of 4 years in psychiatric hospital and another 4 1/2 years in community supervision.