In the following text

In the following text, I present summaries of 3 peer-reviewed articles based on primary studies addressing the association between advanced maternal age and perinatal mortality. I also articulate my opinion on whether or not there was evidence of a causal association between the exposure and outcome, provide recommendations for future directions in regard to further study and discuss a possible public health intervention to address the outcome.
Article 1: Perinatal Mortality and Advanced Maternal Age
The authors of this retrospective cohort study sought to explore the impact of advanced maternal age on the rate of perinatal mortality. They hypothesized that there was a difference in the risk of perinatal mortality between women of advanced age (?35 years) and women younger than 35 years. (Mutz-Dehbalaie et al., 2014)
To test this hypothesis, they gathered basic demographic data, along with basic data on course of pregnancy, delivery and perinatal outcome, from the Perinatal Registry of Tyrol, Austria. This included 56,517 singleton hospital deliveries over a 10-year period. There were 308 perinatal deaths that occurred during this time. (Mutz-Dehbalaie et al., 2014)
Collected data was examined according to maternal age at delivery in 3 groups of women: 25-24 years (reference group), 35-39 years and ? 40 years. The authors calculated univariate and age-related odds ratios for perinatal mortality as the key endpoint. (Mutz-Dehbalaie et al., 2014).
In addition, a multivariate model was built starting with terms for age, post-miscarriage status, occupation, smoking, obesity, immigrant status,